Many fans of football still wonder how clubs afford to pay their players and staffs those huge amounts of money that we read on the news. This article will give you the answers on how clubs support themselves financially.

Broadcasting Rights

Domestic and Foreign Broadcasting stations compete to buy for rights to broadcast live matches to millions of football lovers who are looking forward to watch. For instance, in the United Kingdom, Sky Sports and BT Sports have rights to broadcast the Premier League, by paying 5 Billion Pounds for 4 years (2015–2019) .This money will be divided among clubs, equally which is roughly 81 million pounds per club. Remember that’s only deals from the U.K.

Outside of england, 20 Broadcasters have rights to broadcast the Premier league in China, and there are over 100 worldwide broadcasters who hold rights to cover the P.L who must pay huge cash to cover these matches. Now you do the Maths.

Match Day Revenue

When a football team play at their home stadium, they sell tickets to fan that enter the stadium on match day. The capacity of a football clubs stadium and the ticket price determines the revenue which is varied from one to another. In the premier league each team play 19 times on home stadium. Now you understand why clubs build bigger stadiums or expand their capacity.

Manchester United’s home soil — Old Trafford is the biggest stadium in the league, with a capacity of 74,994 sitting. Arsenal Football club sell the most expensive ticket which is 95.5 $ per ticket.

Sponsorship

Brands paid huge amount of money for clubs to promote them. For example Chevrolet paid Manchester United roughly 50 million pounds annually to advertise their logo and name on the United Jersey, Adidas paid 75 million pounds per year to advertise the kits. And that’s just two sponsors among many others that a club can have globally.